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SMALL BOOKS

Way of the Winding Labyrinth: A Map for the Labyrinth of Life – Simple Steps for Experiencing Life as a Spiritual Journey, by Eve Escher Hogan
Written by an active labyrinth facilitator, this book is really about personal development, using the labyrinth as a metaphor. That the labyrinth represents our journey through life is a common theme, so this association is appropriate.

The Goddess in the Labyrinth, by John Kraft
Prior to the current labyrinth revival, Scandinavia had more labyrinths than any other area in the world. There are hundreds of extant labyrinths along the shores of the Baltic, probably built by fishermen centuries ago. Kraft is a Swedish researcher who has been studying these labyrinths for 30 years. Here he dicusses the various myths associated with the Goddess and young maidens and virgins with regards to the labyrinth, spring, and fertility. Available from www.labyrinthos.net.

108 Ways to Use Labyrinths in Schools, by Gael Hancock
Using labyrinths in schools has great potential. The author gives many suggestions that teachers will find valuable. Available through www.labyrinthos.net

Mazes and Labyrinths in Great Britain, by Martineau
One page holds two or three paragraphs of description while the facing page has a labyrinth diagram.

Ariadne's Thread: Legends of the Labyrinth, by Kimberly Lowell Saward
Currently the president of the Labyrinth Society, the author uses her organizational and literary skills to summarize some of the myths and stories around the labyrinth. Website: www.labyrinthos.net

Ancient Labyrinths of the World, by Jeff Saward
Now that the author's two new books are in circulation, I don't know if this one is still available. It is a short account of the world's oldest labyrinths, by the person who knows them best. Website: www.labyrinthos.net

Chartres Labyrinth: A Model of theUniverse and the Journey of the Soul, by Keith Critchlow
This is a new version of the author's 1972 article, in which he now calls it a labyrinth, rather than following British tradition of calling everything a maze. I have studied with the author and respect him highly. He has started two myths about the labyrinth (that it is based on a 13-pointed star and that the rose window would fold down exactly on the labyrinth), which don't happen to be factually accurate. They don't measure out, but the symbolism is what most attracts the author. This book has historical value, in that most early books on labyrinths quote from it. See www.kairos-foundation.com.

Mazes Ancient and Modern, by Robert Field
This is quite a nice little book. Discusses designs of Roman labyrinths and other topics.

No Wrong Turns, by Pamela and Angela Eileen
This is a children's book of 16 pages, with crayon drawings, about walking the labyrinth to talk to God. The text purports to be a child talking, but a few pages are too adult-like to be convincing. Nevertheless, the message is good. It comes with a cloth finger labyrinth of durable quality. I found this on Amazon.com.

A Labyrinth Year, by Richard Kautz
This book is not really about labyrinths. It is a series of meditations about the Bible that can be read outloud while others are walking a labyrinth or following a finger labyrinth. The cover has a drawing of a right-handed Chartres labyrinth. (Ah, publishers . . . . )

In the Labyrinth, by Ulrica Hume
This really is a small book, 4 1/4" x 5 1/2" and 27 pages. It gives a more or less accurate history of the labyrinth plus some personal observations regarding its use. The author describes it as an "inspirational gift book . . . as charming as it is informative." Available from uhume@compuserve.com.

The British Maze Guide, by Adrian Fisher and Jeff Saward
The title is pretty self explanatory.

The Glastonbury Tor Maze, by Geoffrey Ashe
This book describes the now popular idea that the Tor, a pointed hill in Glastonbury, has paths surrounding it that make up a three-dimensional labyrinth. I know many people who have made the three-hour journey, and they tell me the path isn't clear at all.

Peace Labyrinth, Sacred Geometry, by Dr. Beatrice Bartnett
I bought this simply because it was listed on Amazon.com. It is quite bizarre, from a labyrinth maker's point of view. It is based on a single labyrinth designed by the author, which has six circuits and is divided into thirds rather than quadrants. I found little of interest in this book, so far is it from the realms of traditional labyrinths.

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